The BeYou Blog

Eat Better, Move Better, Feel Better

Category: Nutrition (page 1 of 5)

How to avoid post-meal bloat after eating

Have you ever finished a meal and thought, “Why does my stomach stick out like I’m pregnant?!” Hey, don’t get mad at us, we know that the majority of you are asking questions like this, Google says so. However, please ignore this sentiment if you are indeed pregnant. Anyways, post-meal bloat happens when you eat a large meal regardless whether it’s healthy or not. It’s a sign that your body is working hard to digest.

It’s important to mention that this kind of bloat can also be the way your body reacts to certain foods. Some foods cause bloating (salty snacks like chips, pretzels and popcorn) and water retention, which makes the stomach area appear larger than it actually is.

In order to prevent unwanted bloat, we suggest you avoid the following groups of food when heading out for a day at the beach or when you’re going to be in a situation where you want to look and feel your best:

  • High-sodium foods: Large quantities of sodium prompts your body to hold onto water. This fluid retention can make your muscles look less defined and cause your stomach to appear bigger than it really is. Drink plenty of water to counteract this.
  • Dairy: Some individuals are lactose-intolerant without realizing it. If you are, the lactose (sugar composed of galactose and glucose) in milk, yogurt and cheese can bloat you, making your stomach appear more rotund.
  • Soda: The gases from the carbonation in these drinks can build up in your stomach, leading to bloat and gassiness.
  • Sugar-free foods: In some cases sugar-free is better than sugar-filled, but not when it comes to gut health. Sugar-free foods are often sweetened with sugar alcohols, which can lead to an upset stomach and — you guessed it — bloating.
  • Allergies or sensitivities: Some people may have sensitivities to foods such as fish, shellfish, nuts, soybeans, wheat and eggs, which can trigger inflammation and digestive issues. If you’re wondering whether or not you might have food sensitivities, log meals in your 8fit app or keep a food journal.
  • High fiber foods (beans, lentils, vegetables): Fiber is very good for your gut but if your body isn’t used to it, it can take some time for your digestive system to adjust. Try increasing it slowly, cooking fiber-filled veggies and drinking plenty of water.
  • Bad bacteria: Excessive use of antibiotics, processed foods, and sugar can cause unhealthy bacteria in the gut to run amok. The result is bloating and frequent bathroom runs. Try adding prebiotics to your meals (raw garlic, leeks, onion, asparagus, wheat bran) to fuel the healthy bacteria, and probiotics (unsweetened yogurt, kimchi, sauerkraut, miso) to add more healthy bacteria to your diet to keep your gut happy.

https://8fit.com

6 Ways to Eat Less Sugar

Got a sweet tooth? Here are some tips on how to ditch the cravings.

When it comes to sugar cravings, there’s no easy solution as there are both mental and physiological components that come into play, making it that much harder to give up.

For example, the more sugar and refined foods you eat, the more your body craves, and if you’re prone to emotional triggers, this can often set off a junk food frenzy.

Things you can do: 

  1. Name your triggersKnow what foods set you off and avoid them.  If having cookies, chocolate and ice cream in the house is going to send you into an eating Armageddon, don’t keep them in your pantry or fridge.
  2. Gage your hunger:  Before reaching for that sweet temptation, take a deep breath and ask yourself if you are hungry. If you are, don’t deny yourself food, but choose a healthy snack from one of the options on your BeYou meal planner.
  3. Try writing it out. If you’re not hungry, sit down for 5 minutes and jot down your feelings. Why do you want that junk food? What’s really going on and will food help? Often times, food offers us temporary relief only to make us feel worse about ourselves later. EVERY TIME you find yourself turning to food for comfort, take a few minutes to tune into your true feelings.
  4. Eliminate the source. Sugar has a very addictive quality, as do refined and processed foods. The only way to stop these cravings is to limit your intake or completely stop eating it, as you would with any addiction.  Studies have even proved that sugar is more addictive than crack cocaine. Once you start to rid your diet of the source, your body will lose the urge to eat it.
    How do we do this?
    Slowly. You don’t want to throw your body into shock. If you drink soda or juice, try cutting out 1 drink per day.
  5. Keep a food journal.  On top of writing down your emotional triggers, it’s also a good idea to keep a food journal. Foods these days are so laden with sugar (oftentimes hidden) that we don’t know how much we’re eating. You’ll have to carefully read food labels to track how much sugar you’re eating per day and then try to eliminate just ONE ‘trigger food’ (every day) that you would normally eat.
  6. Find whole food substitutions.  Many people ask what they can substitute a snickers bar for; hoping sugar free, gluten free brownies are the solution. A better alternative however, is fruit, a food that is naturally sweet. You might not think fruit sounds as appealing as junk food, but there are tricks that can certainly help curb a sweet tooth, keep you satisfied and give you an energy boost. For example: The next time you want something sweet, try thinly slicing an apple and sprinkling it with a little cinnamon. Apples are low in sugar, yet sweet, and contain pectin (fiber) that will help you feel full, faster. You can also add a fat, like a few chopped walnuts, for some extra crunch and goodness.

6 Ways to Eat Less Sugar

Got a sweet tooth? Here are some tips on how to ditch the cravings.

When it comes to sugar cravings, there’s no easy solution as there are both mental and physiological components that come into play, making it that much harder to give up.

For example, the more sugar and refined foods you eat, the more your body craves, and if you’re prone to emotional triggers, this can often set off a junk food frenzy.

Things you can do: 

  1. Name your triggersKnow what foods set you off and avoid them.  If having cookies, chocolate and ice cream in the house is going to send you into an eating Armageddon, don’t keep them in your pantry or fridge.
  2. Gage your hunger:  Before reaching for that sweet temptation, take a deep breath and ask yourself if you are hungry. If you are, don’t deny yourself food, but choose a healthy snack from one of the options on your BeYou meal planner.
  3. Try writing it out. If you’re not hungry, sit down for 5 minutes and jot down your feelings. Why do you want that junk food? What’s really going on and will food help? Often times, food offers us temporary relief only to make us feel worse about ourselves later. EVERY TIME you find yourself turning to food for comfort, take a few minutes to tune into your true feelings.
  4. Eliminate the source. Sugar has a very addictive quality, as do refined and processed foods. The only way to stop these cravings is to limit your intake or completely stop eating it, as you would with any addiction.  Studies have even proved that sugar is more addictive than crack cocaine. Once you start to rid your diet of the source, your body will lose the urge to eat it.
    How do we do this?
    Slowly. You don’t want to throw your body into shock. If you drink soda or juice, try cutting out 1 drink per day.
  5. Keep a food journal.  On top of writing down your emotional triggers, it’s also a good idea to keep a food journal. Foods these days are so laden with sugar (oftentimes hidden) that we don’t know how much we’re eating. You’ll have to carefully read food labels to track how much sugar you’re eating per day and then try to eliminate just ONE ‘trigger food’ (every day) that you would normally eat.
  6. Find whole food substitutions.  Many people ask what they can substitute a snickers bar for; hoping sugar free, gluten free brownies are the solution. A better alternative however, is fruit, a food that is naturally sweet. You might not think fruit sounds as appealing as junk food, but there are tricks that can certainly help curb a sweet tooth, keep you satisfied and give you an energy boost. For example: The next time you want something sweet, try thinly slicing an apple and sprinkling it with a little cinnamon. Apples are low in sugar, yet sweet, and contain pectin (fiber) that will help you feel full, faster. You can also add a fat, like a few chopped walnuts, for some extra crunch and goodness.

How to follow a plant-based keto diet ?

In the ’90s, we believed that limiting fat and cholesterol was the key to weight loss and healthy living. But times have changed, and these days various on-trend diets promote eating more healthy fats alongside protein while limiting carbohydrates, particularly of the processed variety (like anything made with white flour or sugar). What better way to improve overall health and lose weight than by eating lots of veggies healthy plant-based fats?

Benefits of Plant-based Keto

The nutritional benefits of a plant-based diet are uncontested. Eating both processed and unprocessed red meat is linked to an increase in death. On the other side, an increased intake of fruits and vegetables is linked with a decrease in chronic disease and body weight. Research has shown that eating more high-quality plant foods and fewer animal foods reduces the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Foods to Restrict

In general, you want to avoid a lot of starchy and sweet foods including:

  • Grains: quinoa, oats, wheat, rice — especially refined wheat and rice
  • Starchy vegetables: potatoes, winter squash, peas and corn
  • Beans and lentils
  • Sugar, honey, agave and maple syrup
  • High-sugar fruits: bananas, grapes, oranges and pineapple
  • All processed grain foods, sweets and desserts

 

Write this list down, post it in your kitchen and carry it with you when you go out to eat or to the market.

Foods to Focus On

Here’s an abridged list of non-starchy veggies that are keto-friendly:

  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Bell pepper
  • Pumpkin
  • Okra
  • Green beans
  • Eggplant
  • Cabbage
  • Bok choy
  • Broccoli
  • Arugula
  • Artichoke
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Carrots
  • Swiss chard
  • Kale

 

Many of these vegetables are good sources of protein as well, which can help dieters fulfill their small, yet important, daily protein quota. When it comes to fats, we recommend healthy plant fats like avocados, olives, coconuts (and their oils), nuts and seeds. Some of the foods you can indulge in include:

  • Coconut cream (sugar-free)
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Pecans
  • Walnuts
  • Hemp seeds
  • Cocoa butter
  • Nut butters
  • Nut cheeses

 

Source: https://www.livestrong.com

How to follow a plant-based keto diet ?

In the ’90s, we believed that limiting fat and cholesterol was the key to weight loss and healthy living. But times have changed, and these days various on-trend diets promote eating more healthy fats alongside protein while limiting carbohydrates, particularly of the processed variety (like anything made with white flour or sugar). What better way to improve overall health and lose weight than by eating lots of veggies healthy plant-based fats?

Benefits of Plant-based Keto

The nutritional benefits of a plant-based diet are uncontested. Eating both processed and unprocessed red meat is linked to an increase in death. On the other side, an increased intake of fruits and vegetables is linked with a decrease in chronic disease and body weight. Research has shown that eating more high-quality plant foods and fewer animal foods reduces the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Foods to Restrict

In general, you want to avoid a lot of starchy and sweet foods including:

  • Grains: quinoa, oats, wheat, rice — especially refined wheat and rice
  • Starchy vegetables: potatoes, winter squash, peas and corn
  • Beans and lentils
  • Sugar, honey, agave and maple syrup
  • High-sugar fruits: bananas, grapes, oranges and pineapple
  • All processed grain foods, sweets and desserts

 

Write this list down, post it in your kitchen and carry it with you when you go out to eat or to the market.

Foods to Focus On

Here’s an abridged list of non-starchy veggies that are keto-friendly:

  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Bell pepper
  • Pumpkin
  • Okra
  • Green beans
  • Eggplant
  • Cabbage
  • Bok choy
  • Broccoli
  • Arugula
  • Artichoke
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Carrots
  • Swiss chard
  • Kale

 

Many of these vegetables are good sources of protein as well, which can help dieters fulfill their small, yet important, daily protein quota. When it comes to fats, we recommend healthy plant fats like avocados, olives, coconuts (and their oils), nuts and seeds. Some of the foods you can indulge in include:

  • Coconut cream (sugar-free)
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Pecans
  • Walnuts
  • Hemp seeds
  • Cocoa butter
  • Nut butters
  • Nut cheeses

 

Source: https://www.livestrong.com

The Benefits of Brussel Sprouts

Brussels sprouts belong to the Brassicaceae family of vegetables and are packed with many nutrients. They provide a full range of benefits for your health:

  • May protect you against cancer

Brussel sprouts are rich in antioxidants, especially in kaempferol, an antioxidant that may reduce cancer growth. Moreover, antioxidants in Brussels sprouts can neutralize free radicals (formed by oxidative stress) and may decrease the risk of cancer.

  • Promote heart health and overall health

Brussel sprouts have an impressive antioxidant content. These compounds can reduce oxidative stress in your cells and help reduce the risk of chronic disease and decrease inflammation. Their content in fiber can also reduce the risk of heart disease.

  • Promote gut health

Brussel sprouts are high in fiber. For a half cup of Brussels sprouts (78 grams), you will receive 8% of your daily fiber needs. Due to their high content in fiber, eating Brussels sprouts may relieve constipation and promote digestive health by helping feed the beneficial bacteria in your gut. It is recommended to eat 25 grams of fiber per day for women and 38 grams of fiber per day for men.

  • Help maintain healthy blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of diabetes

Brussels sprouts are high in fiber, which can improve blood sugar control, by keeping their levels steady. Studies have demonstrated that Brussels sprouts consumption was linked to a decreased risk of diabetes. Fiber tend to slow the absorption of sugar into the blood.

  • Promote bone health

Brussel sprouts are rich in vitamin K, which is essential for coagulation and blood clotting. Vitamin K also promote bone growth and strength (decrease the risk of bone fracture).

9 Reasons You Don’t Need to Fear Healthy Carbs

Carb intake is one of the most hotly debated topics in nutritional science. Carbs are now accused of causing weight gain, heart disease, and various other problems.

It’s true that junk foods tend to be high in carbs — particularly refined carbs — and that low-carb diets can be incredibly beneficial, especially for weight loss, diabetes, and certain other health conditions. However, not all carb sources are created equal. Refined carbs can be harmful in high amounts, but whole-food sources of carbs are very healthy. In fact, many of the world’s healthiest foods are fairly high in carbs.

Here are 9 reasons why you don’t need to fear all carbs.

1. Carbs Are Not Uniquely Fattening

Scientists once hypothesized that carbs increased the risk of obesity more than fat and protein. Carbs may raise insulin levels, which promotes the storage of calories as fat which increases the risk of obesity. However, no compelling evidence supports the idea that high-carb diets are especially fattening. Nevertheless, healthy low-carb diets have been proven effective for weight loss — at least in the short term (6).

In short, the quality of the carbs you eat is of greater importance than the proportion of carbs in your diet. Thus, you should avoid eating a lot of sugar and other refined carbs, and instead focus on whole, carb-rich foods like fruits, vegetables, roots, and tubers.

2. Early Humans Frequently Ate Carbs

Yet, new evidence indicates that carb-rich foods like root vegetables, legumes, and even grains were cooked and consumed by human ancestors as well, long before they started farming.

3. Gluten Intolerance Affects Few People

A gluten-free diet is necessary for the small number of people with celiac disease or some other types of autoimmune disease or for people with gluten sensitivity or wheat intolerance. However, studies indicate that few people with self-reported gluten sensitivity have this condition at all.

4. Fiber — a Carbohydrate — Is Important for Optimal Health

Most dietary fiber is made of carbohydrates. Eating fiber is good for your health, particularly for heart health and weight management.

5. Gut Bacteria Rely on Carbs for Energy

Eating soluble fiber may play a crucial role in maintaining a healthy balance of gut bacteria.

6. Legumes Are a Superfood — on a Nutrient-To-Cost Basis

Legumes are incredibly healthy and they are naturally high in carbs. They’re rich in protein, fiber, and other valuable nutrients.

7. Cutting Carbs Does Not Improve Exercise Performance

Athletes don’t perform better on low-carb diets than higher-carb ones. Performance is similar for endurance but worse for sprinting if you’ve cut down on carbs.

8. Carbs Don’t Cause Brain Damage

There is no evidence linking whole carb sources to brain damage or diseases like Alzheimer’s. In fact, the Mediterranean diet, which is rich in whole grains, is linked to improved brain health.

9. The World’s Longest-Lived Populations Eat Plenty of Carbs

Source: https://www.healthline.com

How to stop feeling sleepy after eating a meal?

Feeling tired, or having difficulty concentrating, after a meal is relatively common. A person may feel particularly tired, depending on what, when, and how much they ate.

Feeling tired after a meal can be frustrating, especially after lunch, when a person may need to be alert.

A drop in energy during the day can be particularly dangerous for people who work in risky conditions, such as those who operate machinery or vehicles.

2017 study of the effects of eating on the performance of night shift workers found that those who ate at night performed worse and were more sleepy at 4 a.m. than those who had not eaten.

The following strategies can help prevent tiredness after a meal:

  • Eat little and often. Rather than eating big meals, eat smaller meals and snacks every few hours to keep up energy levels. A piece of fruit or a handful of nuts should be enough to cure an energy dip. People who eat larger lunches may experience more of an afternoon slump than those who eat less at midday. Foods rich in protein and carbohydrates can make people feel sleepier than other foods (avoid salmon, poultry, eggs, spinach, soy products, cheese, pasta, rice etc).
  • Get good-quality sleep. A person who gets enough sleep at night is less likely to experience a significant post-lunch energy dip.
  • Go for a walk. Getting light exercise during the day, especially after eating, can help people feel less tired.
  • Take a short nap during the day.
  • Try bright-light therapy. Authors of a 2015 study found that exposing people to bright light after lunch reduced tiredness.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol with meals. Alcohol can make people feel more tired.

 

Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com

Science Talks: Men Lose Weight More Quickly Than Women

Ladies, if you ever pit yourself against a male partner when it comes to lose weight, sibling, or friend in a weight loss competition, don’t be surprised when you encounter a harsh reality. Indeed, scientists say the way men’s bodies are built and even where they store fat helps them lose weight more easily than women: they can lose weight faster and they can also garner more health benefits than women. 

If you want some proof, read the description of the following study:

A study on 2,200 overweight adults with prediabetes in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand details their weight loss results. These adults had to follow an 800-calorie diet made of soups, shakes, hot cereals, and low-calorie vegetables for 8 weeks. 

The Results:

Men lost 16 percent more weight than women — about 26 pounds compared with an average of 22 pounds for women. Additionally, 35 percent of the men and women in the study had normal blood glucose levels and fell out of the prediabetes classification. Men had a lower heart rate, less body fat and a lower risk for diabetes than the women did.

In the same time, this low-calorie diet had also some bad impacts on women’s health: their good cholesterol decreased as well as the bone mineral density (can lead to weaker bones) and body mass (it slows the metabolism and weight loss). 

Each of the adults also had prediabetes, a condition marked by slightly elevated blood sugar levels. People with prediabetes are at a higher risk for eventually developing type 2 diabetes.

But why? 

This result comes down to the difference in how men and women are built. Men burn more calories than women as they typically carry their weight in their midsection, whereas women carry their fat around their hips, thighs, and butt. Physiologically, men are built to burn fat more quickly. They have more lean muscle mass and a naturally higher metabolic rate. The more your body has lean muscle, the more it burns. 

Source: https://www.healthline.com

What should you eat after a HIIT session to refuel your body?

What should you eat after a HIIT session to refuel your body?

After a good sweaty workout such as a heavy HIIT session with high heart rates, your body needs to be refueled with high-protein, antioxidant-rich foods.

What is a HIIT session? In case you don’t know this type of workout, HIIT can be defined as a workout with short bursts of high-intensity exercises followed by short rest periods. According to some studies, HIIT has been linked to weight loss and strengthen your muscle.

However, if you add it to your routine, it is important to pair it with the right nutrition to replace the energy lost during your workout, ideally no later than 60 to 90 minutes after your workout. Discover which foods to eat to refuel your body:

  • Eggs

Eggs are one of the best foods after a workout as they contain a high amount of protein (around 7 grams per egg)  and healthy fats (around 5 grams per egg). Moreover, eggs contain all nine of the essential amino acids, which have been linked to aiding in muscle recovery. Eggs also contain B vitamins, which can aid in energy production. There is a variety of ways to eat eggs (scrambled, hard-boiled, ..).

  • Blueberries

Blueberries are rich in fiber, vitamins, protein, and antioxidants.  Eating blueberries after a workout has been linked to accelerated muscle recovery time. There are great in a smoothie for example or paired with yogurt or kefir.

  • Avocado

Avocado is an excellent source of magnesium which is linked to better muscle recovery. It also contains potassium and is loaded with folates and vitamins C, K, and B-6 which can help reduce inflammation in the body.

  • Green leafy vegetables

Green leafy vegetables (kale, spinach, arugula, watercress, etc) are full of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber and they are also low in calories. The antioxidants can help to minimize the free radicals that may be released during HIIT training.

  • Protein powder

Another option could be to opt for high-quality protein powder, it’s a great grab-and-go option and it keeps you fuller for longer. But try to keep the sugar content below 6 to 8 grams per serving.

 

Older posts